I think that people are getting more cautious about talking about their income and what their assets are. The mood of the country is just a lot different than it was back the late 1990’s during the tech boom. There are people making good money who have great savings that don’t want to share this information. A large part of that, I think, is the reality that there are many people – MANY people – who have really suffered with recent economic issues in this country. There are many areas of the country that have seen many residents just crushed by things.

Build your audience on a course community: If you’re just getting started building an audience for yourself and want to leverage communities already actively looking for content you can choose to host and sell your online course on a site like Skillshare or Udemy. These are easy, cost-effective ways to build an audience and test your niche to see if there’s demand for it.


26. Services – You can offer a paid service, such as life coaching, blog coaching, goal setting or financial planning. Just be sure to investigate all the legal implications and make sure you’re not claiming to be a professional if you’re not one. With a service like this, you’re basically using your blog to sell yourself. You’ll need to convince people that you’re worth buying and then be able to back up your claims once they purchase your service.
Become a social media virtual assistant.   Do you love Pinterest or Instagram? Many brands and bloggers do not know how to correctly use these social media platforms. Offer your expertise to coach or act as a social media manager. It’s a win-win: the brand gets the right type of social media exposure and you can make money doing something you enjoy.

Once you have that problem or need nailed, the next step is to validate that idea and make sure you’ve actually got customers who will pay for it. This means building a minimum viable product, getting objective feedback from real customers, incorporating updates, testing the market for demand, and getting pricing feedback to ensure there’s enough of a margin between your costs and what consumers are willing to pay.
Upwork: This website offers a great marketplace for selling just about any professional service. You don't need a merchant account, website of your own or anything else for that matter. All you need to do is be able to provide a high-quality service at a reasonable price. But be informed, you will have to compete with many others that are constantly bidding on open jobs. 
The prep work before you open up shop is more time-consuming. You need merchandise to sell, photos and descriptions to post, a name for your shop and a business plan to help you succeed. Once that’s done, you’ll still need to find customers. Depending on what you’re selling, that could take weeks, which is why you should expect the overall time for this gig to be slow.
Write a business plan. Include information on what you plan to do and what differentiates you from competitors. Incorporate market research that shows your understanding of the business sector you wish to enter. Detail what you will sell and how. Consider including a marketing plan and realistic financial projections, if you are 13-15, get some help from an adult if you need to.[3] This will give you structure as you go about starting your business.
Be proactive. Remember Murphy's Law: "Whatever can go wrong will go wrong." Make plans, complete with as many calculations as possible, then anticipate everything that can go wrong. Then make contingency or backup plans for each scenario. Don't leave anything to luck. If you're writing a business plan, for example, do your best to estimate when you'll break even, then multiply that time frame by three to get a more realistic date; and after you've identified all the costs, add 20% to that for costs that will come up that you didn't anticipate. Your best defense against Murphy's law is to assume the worst, and brace yourself. An appropriate amount of insurance may be something worth considering. Don't forget the advice of Louis Pasteur, a French chemist who made several incredible breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of disease: "Luck favors the prepared mind."

Money is just a barometer, often a poor one, of your successes in what you are doing. Money is just an outcome of your overall efforts in your field. You will often hear people saying, "Don't chase money. There is nothing in money. Don't work too hard for money" and stuffs like that. But look around. Everyone is working hard. Everyone is working tirelessly. Everyone is going an extra mile and each one of them started not because they want to get rich, but because it is a matter of survival. Either you do and earn some money or you don't do anything and beg for money. Then there is this competition. Either you do better/more or get perished. Whatever you are doing right now can be done in better ways by many other people. So you put up efforts to stay relevant/ahead. When Google arrived on the scense, there were other search engines. They didn't innovate. Google came with better solution. Now rest of them are extinct. What if Google stop innovating? They too will go extinct. Larry and Sergy would see their fortunes dipping in matter of months.


Prior to that group, they had an online community for teachers looking for lesson plans. That probably sounds pretty random, but it's crazy the type of communities you can build and rally people around. If it's something that you're passionate about yourself and you want to connect with others that have that same passion, then an online community is something you should definitely consider.
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