Blogging is something that requires patience, persistence and discipline. It may mean writing everyday for over a year before you really start to see any money from it. There are exceptions to the rule, but from my dealings with other bloggers, it seems to be pretty common to spend one or even two years building your blog, your brand and your authority, before making any serious amount of money.
Research other listings in your city on AirBnB and see what the going rate is for a place like yours. You could also just rent out a private room as well or even a bed in a shared room. In fact, that's how AirBnB got its start. However, you might find it hard in the beginning without reviews, but as long as you take really good care of your guests and provide a lot of value, the reviews will eventually come rolling in. 

Hi Tom! This is exactly what I have been looking for. I jumped into affiliate marketing about a year ago and have been dragging my feet because I have not been convinced it was as great as all the posts I’ve been reading. You are clear, easy to understand, inspiring and no BS. THANK YOU! I’m ready to move forward now, and I’ll definitely be watching for more great information from you! BTW – I love that you pay it forward!
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17. Amazon – Have you heard of FBA? It stands for “Fulfilled by Amazon” and it’s getting pretty popular. Basically, you buy products (in bulk is best) and ship them to Amazon for them to store. When your products sell, Amazon packs them up, ships them out and sends you the money (after taking their cut). There are people making a full-time living from FBA, while others just do it for some extra money.
Create a killer course experience: With your course validated and in the works, you need to figure out how people will take it. Most course creators choose to host their courses (after going down the path of learning how to make a website) on their own blogs. This way, they get all the value of bringing customers back to their site on a regular basis. I host my own courses from a subdomain on my own site so I can easily add more. The course experience is incredibly important as well. And after trying most of the solutions, I highly recommend Teachable—an online platform designed specifically for courses.

1. What industry are you in and what would you enjoy making content about? If you go into an industry only based on commission, and don’t enjoy the topic, you risk getting burnt out. The #1 problem for bloggers is finding time/getting excited to create content. If you tell me more about what you’re passionate about, I can steer you towards some programs.
Transcription is one of my part time jobs. I can do it conveniently from home and many of the clients are trainers or speakers. Having money and needing transcription services doesn’t imply you have a secretary. At my full time job the closest we have to a secretary is the CEO’s assistant. She books flights, plans travel, schedules meetings, transports his children, and helps with home renovations. She doesn’t have the time to sit and transcribe work when the CEO can send it to a company or freelance agent for a few dollars.
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